Neonatal Health

Regional Health and Education Profiles

We explore trends in neonatal mortality rate (NMR) from 1993 to 2014 using data from the Demographic and Health Survey from 1993-2014. Click on the Regional Trends Below to see how neonatal mortality differs by region in Ghana.


More Projects on Neonatal Health:

 

National and Regional Change in Neonatal Mortality in Ghana, from 1993-2014

The dealth of a child causes significant pain to families, so everything needs to be done to prevent unnecessary child deaths. One way to assess how weel a county is doing in realtion to children's health is to look at their neonatal mortality rate, a health indicator that measures how many children die in a country before their first month of life for every 1,000 that are born alive. 

In Ghana, neonatal mortality accounts for about 40% of child deaths in the first five years of life. Currently, for every 1,000 children that are born, 29 of them will die in the first month - that's about 2,000 preventable deaths per year. Based on data from the Demographic and Health survey from 1993-2014, we tracked the progress of each region in reducing neonatal mortality. We also ranked them based on how change has occured in each region, by examining the average change per year. 

Neonatal Mortality Overview

Neonatal Mortality Overview

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Fast Facts About State of Neonatal Mortality Rate (NMR) in Ghana

  • The Northern Region has seen the highest decline of NMR in the country. Since 1993-2014; its rate of decline (8 deaths per 1000 live births) has exceeded the national average by 4 times (1.96 deaths per 1000 live births).

  • From 1998-2014, the Upper East Region is the only region whose NMR has been below the national average. The region has reduced its NMR rate by 48%, since 1993.

  • Greater Accra Region ranks third in the rate of decline of NMR since 1993, behind the Upper East Region and Northern Region. The region has cut its NMR by 43% between 1993-2014.

  • The year 2007 was the only time the Volta Region had the lowest NMR in the country (22 deaths per 1000 live births compared to national average of 29 deaths per 1000 live births). Its NMR in 2014 is about the same as the national average (30 deaths compared to 29 deaths per 1000 live births).

  • For the past 21 years, the Central Region has never seen its NMR fall below 35 deaths per 1000. Its NMR in 2014 was 7 points higher than the national average.

  • The NMR in the Brong Ahafo Region has not changed since 2008 (27 deaths per 1000 live births)

  • The NMR in the Western Region has always been higher than the national average, except in 1998.

  • Of the three regions in the north, the Upper West Region has seen the least progress in reducing the NMR. Its rate of NMR decline from 1988 to 2014 is 13 times lower than that of the Northern Region and about 6 times lower than the Upper East Region.

  • In 2014, the Ashanti Region had the highest NMR in the country; (42 deaths per 1000 live births compared national avarage of 29 deaths per 1000 live births); it ranks 9th out of ten in terms of progress in reducing NMR, from 1993-2014.

  • In 2014, the NMR in the Eastern Region was the same as it was 21 years ago in 1993 ( 30 deaths per 1000 live births).

Comparison between two LBW babies and a normal birth weight baby (farthest right).    Source: https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/290824/view

Comparison between two LBW babies and a normal birth weight baby (farthest right).

Source: https://www.sciencephoto.com/media/290824/view